Westampton Township, New Jersey

Township

Township of Westampton

Westampton Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.

Census Bureau map of Westampton Township, New Jersey

Coordinates: 40°01′06″N 74°49′00″W / 40.018416°N 74.816778°W / 40.018416; -74.816778Coordinates: 40°01′06″N 74°49′00″W / 40.018416°N 74.816778°W / 40.018416; -74.816778[1][2]

Country
 United States

State
 New Jersey

County
Burlington

Incorporated
March 6, 1850

Government[6]

 • Type
Township

 • Body
Township committee

 • Mayor
C. Andre Daniels (D, term ends December 31, 2016)[3][4]

 • Clerk
Donna Ryan[5]

Area[1]

 • Total
11.195 sq mi (28.994 km2)

 • Land
11.025 sq mi (28.555 km2)

 • Water
0.170 sq mi (0.439 km2)  1.51%

Area rank
199th of 566 in state
19th of 40 in county[1]

Elevation[7]
72 ft (22 m)

Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]

 • Total
8,813

 • Estimate (2015)[11]
8,726

 • Rank
261st of 566 in state
18th of 40 in county[12]

 • Density
799.4/sq mi (308.7/km2)

 • Density rank
405th of 566 in state
26th of 40 in county[12]

Time zone
Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)

 • Summer (DST)
Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)

ZIP code
08060 – Mount Holly[13]

Area code(s)
609[14]

FIPS code
3400578200[1][15][16]

GNIS feature ID
0882103[1][17]

Website
www.westampton.com

Westampton Township is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township’s population was 8,813[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 1,596 (+22.1%) from the 7,217 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,213 (+20.2%) from the 6,004 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]
Westampton was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 6, 1850, from portions of Northampton Township (now known as Mount Holly Township). Portions of the township were taken to form Eastampton Township on February 11, 1880.[19] Its name derives from its original location in the western portion of what was Northampton Township.[20]
The township is the home of the National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office serving the Philadelphia metropolitan area.[21]

Contents
자놀

2007–08 Scottish Challenge Cup

Country
Scotland

Teams
30

Defending champions
Ross County

Champions
St Johnstone

Runners-up
Dunfermline Athletic

Matches played
29

Goals scored
90 (3.1 per match)

← 2006–07
2008–09 →

The 2007–08 Scottish Challenge Cup was the 17th season of the Scottish Challenge Cup, which was competed for by all 30 members of the Scottish Football League. The defending champions were Ross County who defeated Clyde 5–4 on penalties in the 2006 final. Ross County were eliminated in the second round after a 2–0 home defeat to eventual champions St Johnstone.
The final was played on 25 November 2007, between Dunfermline Athletic and St Johnstone, at Dens Park in Dundee. St Johnstone won 3–2.[1] It was their first cup win in their 122-year existence.

Contents

1 Schedule
2 First round

2.1 North and East region
2.2 South and West region

3 Second round
4 Quarter-finals
5 Semi-finals
6 Final
7 References
8 External links

Schedule[edit]

Round
First match date
Fixtures
Clubs

First round
14 August 2007
14
30 → 16

Second round
4 September 2007
8
16 → 80

Quarter-finals
18 September 2007
4
8 → 4

Semi-finals
2 October 2007
2
4 → 2

Final
25 November 2007
1
2 → 1

First round[edit]
North and East region[edit]
Dunfermline Athletic received a random bye into the second round.

Home team
Score
Away team
Additional information

Dundee !Dundee
1–2
Ross County !Ross County

Sturm  59′
O’Brien  90′

Barrowman  12’ (pen.)
Keddie  43′

Report
Report link

Date
14 August 2007

Stadium
Dens Park, Dundee

Attendance
1,471

Referee
D McDonald

Elgin City !Elgin City
1–4
Brechin City !Brechin City

Nicholson  88′

Russell  9′,  60’ (pen.)
Janczyk  70′
Johnson  74′

Report
Report link

Date
14 August 2007

Stadium
Borough Briggs, Elgin

Attendance
166

Referee
C MacKay

Forfar Athletic !Forfar Athletic
3–2
East Fife !East Fife

Lombardi  26′
Tulloch  85′
Lunan  104′

Walker  53′
O’Reilly  69′

Report
Report link

Date
14 August 2007

Stadium
Station Park, Forfar

Attendance
319

Referee
S MacDonald

Montrose !Montrose
5–1
Stirling Albion !Stirling Albion

Baird  11’ (pen.),  32′,  59′
Wood  50′,  52′

Harris  51′

Report
Report link

Date
14 August 2007

Stadium
Links Park, Montrose

도신

1979 Egypt Cup Final

Event
1978–79 Egypt Cup

Zamalek
Ghazl El Mahalla

3
0

Date
27 April 1979

← 1978
1981 →

1979 Egypt Cup Final, was the final match of the 1978–79 Egypt Cup, was between Zamalek and Ghazl El Mahalla, Zamalek won the match 3–0.[1]

Match details[edit]

Zamalek v Ghazl El Mahalla

27 April 1979

Zamalek
3 – 0
Ghazl El Mahalla

Khalil  15′
Kamel  43′
Gaafar  63’ (.pen)
Report

Zamalek:

GK

Adel El-Maamour

RB

Sami Mansour

CB

Mahmoud Saad

CB

Ibrahim Youssef

LB

Sabri El-Meniawi

CM

Tarek Ghonaim

 ?’

CM

Farouk Gaafar

RW

Magdi Shalaby

 ?’

AM

Wahid Kamel

FW

Ali Khalil

FW

Mahmoud El-Khawaga

Substitutions:

DF

Mohamed Taher

 ?’

MF

Mohamed Abdullah “Hamama”

 ?’

Manager:

Ghazl El Mahalla:

GK

El-Balouty

RB

Khaled Karam

CB

El-Said Abdel Gawwad

CB

Mohamed El-Gamil

LB

Sukkar

CM

Shawki Ghareeb

CM

Lotfi El-Shennawi

RW

Kamal Abdel Khalek

 ?’

AM

Omar Abdullah

 ?’

LW

Nabil Kharoub

CF

Ahmed Hassan

Substitutions:

MF

Abdel Rehim Khalil

 ?’

FW

Hossam Abdel Ghani

 ?’

Manager:

References[edit]

^ http://www.angelfire.com/ak/EgyptianSports/zamalekcup7879.html#Mahala

External links[edit]

http://www.angelfire.com/ak/EgyptianSports/ZamalekInEgyptCup.html#1979

v
t
e

Egypt Cup

Seasons

1921–22
1922–23
1923–24
1924–25
1925–26
1926–27
1927–28
1928–29
1929–30
1930–31
1931–32
1932–33
1933–34
1934–35
1935–36
1936–37
1937–38
1938–39
1939–40
1940–41
1941–42
1942–43
1943–44
1944–45
1945–46
1946–47
1947–48
1948–49
1949–50
1950–51
1951–52
1952–53
1953–54
1954–55
1955–56
1956–57
1957–58
1958–59
1990–91
1991–92
1992–93
1993–94
1994–95
1995–96
1996–97
1997–98
1998–99
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
2002–03
2003–04
2004–05
2005–06
2006–07
2007–08
2008–09
2009–10
2010–11
2011–12
2012–13
2013–14
2014–15
2015–16
2016–17

Finals

1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988

써니넷

South African Class 5E, Series 1

No. E259 at the Bellville Depot, Cape Town, 24 May 2009

Type and origin

Power type
Electric

Designer
English Electric

Builder
English Electric
Vulcan Foundry

Serial number
EE 2163-2222
VF E137-E148

Model
EE 5E

Build date
1954-1955

Total produced
60

Specifications

AAR wheel arr.
B-B

UIC class
Bo’Bo’

Gauge
3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm) Cape gauge

Wheel diameter
1,219 mm (48.0 in)

Wheelbase
11,279 mm (37 ft 0.1 in)

 • Bogie
3,430 mm (11 ft 3.0 in)

Pivot centres
7,849 mm (25 ft 9.0 in)

Panto shoes
6,972 mm (22 ft 10.5 in)

Length:

 • Over couplers
15,494 mm (50 ft 10.0 in)

 • Body
14,631 mm (48 ft 0 in)

Width
2,896 mm (9 ft 6.0 in)

Height:

 • Pantograph
4,089 mm (13 ft 5.0 in)

 • Body height
3,937 mm (12 ft 11.0 in)

Axle load
21,591 kg (47,600 lb)

Adhesive weight
86,364 kg (190,400 lb)

Loco weight
86,364 kg (190,400 lb)

Power supply
Catenary

Current collection
Pantographs

Traction motors
Four EE 529

 • Rating 1 hour
377 kW (506 hp)

 • Continuous
325 kW (436 hp)

Gear ratio
18:67

Loco brake
Air & Regenerative

Train brakes
Vacuum

Couplers
AAR knuckle

Performance figures

Maximum speed
97 km/h (60 mph)

Power output:

 • 1 hour
1,508 kW (2,022 hp)

 • Continuous
1,300 kW (1,700 hp)

Tractive effort:

 • Starting
200 kN (45,000 lbf)

 • 1 hour
128 kN (29,000 lbf)

 • Continuous
104 kN (23,000 lbf)

Career

Operators
South African Railways
Spoornet
Impala Platinum
Driefontein

Class
Class 5E

Power class
3 kV DC

Number in class
60

Numbers
E259-E318

Nicknames
Klein Mamba (Little Mamba)

Delivered
1955-1956

First run
1955

The South African Railways Class 5E, Series 1 of 1955 was an electric locomotive.
In 1955 and 1956, the South African Railways placed sixty Class 5E, Series 1 electric locomotives with a Bo-Bo wheel arrangement in mainline service. The Class 5E introduced what eventually became the most prolific locomotive body shape to ever run on South African rails.[1][2]

Contents

1
뉴야넷

This is a Chinese name; the family name is Gong.

Gong Zhichao

Personal information

Country
 China

Born
(1977-12-15) December 15, 1977 (age 39)
Anhua, Hunan

Height
163 cm (5 ft 4 in)

Weight
53 kg (117 lb)

Coach
Li Lingwei

Women’s singles

Highest ranking
1

Medal record

Women’s badminton

Representing  China

Olympic Games

2000 Sydney
Singles

BWF profile

Gong Zhichao (simplified Chinese: 龚智超; traditional Chinese: 龔智超; pinyin: Gōng Zhìchāo; born December 15, 1977 in Anhua, Hunan) is a female badminton player from the People’s Republic of China.
Career[edit]
Gong was one of the world’s leading women’s singles players between her first international titles in 1996 and her retirement in 2002. She won some of the world’s biggest tournaments including the venerable All-England Championship consecutively in 2000 and 2001 over fellow countrywomen Dai Yun and Zhou Mi respectively in the finals. Her other titles included the 1996 Asian Championships, the 2000 Copenhagen Masters; and the Denmark (1996), Swedish (1997), China (1997), Japan (1998, 2000), and Malaysia (2000) Opens. At the then biennial IBF (BWF) World Championships Gong was a silver medalist behind fellow countrywoman Ye Zhaoying in 1997, and a bronze medalist in 2001. She played winning singles for Chinese Uber Cup (women’s international) teams that reclaimed the world team title from Indonesia in 1998 and retained the title in 2000.
Unfortunately for Gong, her biggest triumph in an event for individual players, women’s singles at the 2000 Olympic Games, is tainted by controversy. According to his later statement, China’s head badminton coach Li Yongbo instructed Gong’s semifinal opponent, teammate Ye Zhaoying, to “throw” the match against her, on his assumption that Gong would have the better chance to defeat Denmark’s Camilla Martin in the final.[1] Whatever the effect of these “instructions” on Ye, a two time former IBF World Champion, she lost the match to Gong 8-11, 8-11, who in turn defeated reigning IBF World Champion Martin for the gold medal 13-10, 11-3.
References[edit]

^ “Chinese Coach Admits the Team Decision in Women’s Singles of Badminton in 2000 Sydney Olympic Games”. 

External links[edit]

Gong Zhichao at BWF.tournamentsoftware.com
“Gong Zhichao”. Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. 

v
t
e

Olympic Badminton Champions in Women’s Singles

1972 (Dem
토렌트

The Very Reverend
Nicola Sullivan

Dean of Southwell

Diocese
Diocese of Southwell and Nottingham

In office
2016–present

Predecessor
John Guille

Other posts
Bishop’s chaplain (2002–2007) and Sub-Dean of Wells Cathedral (2003–2007)
Archdeacon of Wells (2007–2016)

Orders

Ordination
1995

Personal details

Born
(1958-08-15) 15 August 1958 (age 58)[1]

Nationality
British

Denomination
Anglican

Alma mater
Wycliffe Hall, Oxford[1]

Nicola Ann Sullivan (born 15 August 1958) is a British Church of England priest. She is the current Dean of Southwell and previously [[Archdeacon of Wells], a post she held despite no experience as a parish priest].
Early life and education[edit]
Sullivan was brought up in Suffolk.[1] She qualified as a nurse in 1981 and a midwife in 1984, after which she worked both in the United Kingdom and, with Tearfund, in Swaziland and Ethiopia.[2][3]
Ordained ministry[edit]
She was ordained in 1995 and her clerical career began with a curacy at St Anne’s Church in Earlham near Norwich.[1] In 1999 she took up the post of associate vicar at Bath Abbey and became chaplain to the Bishop of Bath and Wells in 2002.[4] She was made Sub-Dean of Wells Cathedral in 2003.[2]
Sullivan was appointed Archdeacon of Wells and a residentiary canon of Wells Cathedral in 2007. The role of archdeacon involves oversight of 200 parishes in the eastern half of the county of Somerset.[4][5]
In 2013, Sullivan was elected as one of eight senior women clergy, called “regional representatives”, to attend meetings of the House of Bishops, one of the three chambers of the General Synod of the Church of England, the church’s legislature.[6] As regional representative for the south-west of England (comprising the dioceses of Truro, Salisbury, Bath & Wells, Gloucester, Bristol and Exeter), she will attend meetings of the house in a speaking, but non-voting, capacity until such time as six women sit as full members of the house.[2]
On 4 April 2016, it was announced that Sullivan was to become Dean of Southwell[7] from her installation there on 17 September 2016.[8]
References[edit]

^ a b c d Sullivan, Nicola Sullivan. ukwhoswho.com. Who’s Who. 2014 (2014 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 15 January 2014. 
^ a b c “Archdeacon Nicola elected to House of Bishops to represent south west”. Diocese of Bath and Wells. 30 September 2013. Retrieved 15 January 2014. 
^ “Women in the Commun
은꼴

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Select Live

Select Live Logo

Presented by
Drew Neemia

Country of origin
New Zealand

Original language(s)
English

Production

Running time
120 – 180 minutes

Release

Original network
C4 (New Zealand)

Original release
2003 – 2010

External links

Website

Select Live and Select were music video request shows that screened every day on the C4 music channel in New Zealand. The shows operated for fifty weeks a year from 2003 to 2010, with videos added to the playlist each week.
The original format show, Select, originally played every day from 4:00pm to 7:00pm but later only aired on weekend days during this timeslot. This show did not have a presenter; special “text codes” scrolled along the bottom of the screen and corresponded to a particular song.
The Select Live format screened weekdays from 4:00pm to 6:00pm. Songs to be played were requested by sending an SMS message of a particular format to a designated number. The show was hosted by Joel Defries from 2005 until August 3, 2007, then by Jermaine Leef until 2008, then by Drew Neemia until 2011. It was initially sponsored by Vodafone and broadcast as Vodafone Select Live.
Regular segments featured on the live screenings of the show include Under Drew’s Hat, which features celebrity gossip and news, Top 5, which screens on Fridays, featuring the songs most voted for on the show and the “Mattle” with Drew Neemia versus C4’s Matt in a battle of music videos for viewers to vote for.
The show was cancelled on 4 February 2010 when C4 was moved to Freeview to make way for FOUR; retro video shuffle C42 replaced it on the programming schedule. A similar format show was introduced on FOUR, initially called Drew and Shannon Live and later called Four Live.

성인만화

John Corrie

Member of the European Parliament
for West Midlands

In office
10 June 1999 – 10 June 2004

Preceded by
Position established

Succeeded by
Mike Nattrass

Personal details

Born
Scotland, United Kingdom

Political party
Conservative

Occupation
Politician

John Alexander Corrie (born 29 July 1935) is a Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party politician and chief of Clan Corrie. He describes himself in Who’s Who as a “consultant on African affairs and financial adviser to developing countries”.[1]

Contents

1 Early life
2 Political career
3 References
4 External links

Early life[edit]
Corrie was educated at Kirkcudbright Academy, George Watson’s College, Edinburgh and Lincoln Agricultural College, New Zealand. He is a farmer, and was the Nuffield Scholar in agriculture 1972/1973.
Political career[edit]
He was Chairman of the Young Unionists 1963–64.
Corrie contested North Lanarkshire in 1964 and Central Ayrshire in 1966. He was Member of Parliament for Bute and Northern Ayrshire from February 1974 to 1983, and for Cunninghame North from 1983 until the 1987 general election, when he lost his seat to the Labour Party candidate Brian Wilson. Although he stood in 1992 for Argyll and Bute, he was defeated and did not return to the Commons.
Corrie was also a Member of the European Parliament (MEP) for three periods. He was an MEP twice in the period when it was indirectly elected, from 1975 to 1976 and from 1977 to 1979. He was later elected the MEP for Worcestershire and South Warwickshire and from 1994 to 1999, and then for the multi-seat West Midlands constituency from the 1999 election.[2] He was Co-President of the African, Caribbean, and Pacific Joint Parliamentary Assembly from 1999–2002, and is now Honorary Life President. Mr. Corrie now also sits as member of the AWEPA Governing Council.[3]
References[edit]

^ Taylor, David (19 August 2011). “Scots Tory grandee leaves Prime Minister embarrassed with bizarre mission to Libya”. Daily Record. Glasgow. Archived from the original on 17 November 2011. Retrieved 24 August 2011. 
^ “John Alexander Corrie”. European Parliament. Archived from the original on 28 March 2014. 
^ “AWEPA Governing Council homepage”. Archived from the original on 21 October 2011. 

External links[edit]

Hansard 1803–2005: contributions in Parliament by John Corrie

Parliament of the United Kingdom

Preceded by
Sir Fitzroy Hew Royle Maclean
Member of Parliament for B
일본야동

Marc Bell

Artist at work; A photo of Marc Bell taken at the Monthly Montreal Comix Jam, February 25, 2004

Born
Marc Bell
1971 (1971)
London, Ontario

Nationality
Canadian

Area(s)

Cartoonist
Artist

Notable works

Shrimpy and Paul and Friends, Hot Potatoe, Pure Pajamas, Stroppy

Marc Bell (born 1971 in London, Ontario) is a Canadian cartoonist and artist. He was initially known for creating comic strips (such as Shrimpy and Paul), but Bell has also created several exhibitions of his mixed media work and watercoloured drawings. Hot Potatoe [sic], a monograph of his work, was released in 2009. His comics have appeared in many Canadian weeklies, Vice, and LA Weekly. He has been published in numerous anthologies, such as Kramers Ergot and The Ganzfeld.

Contents

1 Publications
2 Anthology work
3 Solo exhibitions
4 Awards and nominations
5 Solo and collaborative self-published booklets
6 External links

Publications[edit]

Boof, 1992, Caliber Press (Plymouth, MI)
Hep, 1993, Caliber Press (Plymouth, MI)
The Mojo Action Companion Unit Vol.2 #1, 1997, Exclaim! (Toronto, ON)
Shrimpy and Paul and Friends, 2003, Highwater Books (Brooklyn, NY)
Worn Tuff Elbow #1, 2004, Fantagraphics (Seattle, WA)
The Stacks, 2004, Drawn & Quarterly (Montreal, PQ)
The Hobbit (with Peter Thompson), 2005, PictureBox (Brooklyn, NY)
Fresh From Kiev, 2005, Bulb Comix (Geneva, CH)
Nog a Dod (editor), 2006, Conundrum Press (Montreal, PQ) in association with PictureBox
Ganzfeld #5 (editor), 2007, PictureBox (Brooklyn, NY)
Illusztraijuns for Brain Police [sic], 2008, Drawn & Quarterly/Half World Books (Montreal, PQ)
Hot Potatoe [sic], 2009, Drawn & Quarterly (Montreal, PQ)
Kelp Stingray (with Matthew Thurber), 2009, Nieves (Zurich, CH)
Shrimpy et Paul, 2010, Editions Cornélius (Paris, FR)
Dirty Dishes (editor) by Amy Lockhart, 2010, Drawn and Quarterly (Montreal, PQ)
Pure Pajamas, 2011, Drawn & Quarterly (Montreal, PQ)
Shrimpy e Paul, 2012, A Bolha Editora (Rio de Janeiro, BR)
Rudy (editor) by Mark Connery, 2014, 2D Cloud (Minneapolis, MN)
Love and Forgiveness (editor) by Joe Hale, 2014, Swimmers Group (Toronto, ON)
Boutique Mag, 2014, Colour Code Printing (Toronto, ON)
Stroppy, 2015, Drawn & Quarterly (Montreal, PQ)

Anthology work[edit]

Rosetta, “He Works Inside the Condiment Dispenser”, 2002, Alternative Comics (Gainsville, FL), 4 endflaps on covers
L’enfance Dub Cyclope 2, “Il N’Y A Pas D’Issue!”, Zone Convective (Montreal PQ), 10 page
물방