Aufhausen–Kröhstorf

Line number:
5641

Line length:
14.58 km (9.06 mi)

Track gauge:
1,435 mm (4.708 ft)

Legend

from Arnstorf

0,00
Aufhausen
378,1 m

to Landau an der Isar

2,12
Rengersdorf

3,71
Prunn

5,90
Adldorf

7,66
Eichendorf

10,32
Dornach

12,36
Schlag

14,58
Kröhstorf
341.315 m

The Aufhausen–Kröhstorf railway was a branch line in the province of Lower Bavaria in southern Germany. The entire course of this former railway ran on what is today the municipality of Markt Eichendorf.

Contents

1 Early history and construction
2 Operations
3 Closure
4 See also
5 References
6 Sources
7 External links

Early history and construction[edit]
Following the opening of the Landau–Arnstorf railway in 1903, Eichendorf, which was still without a railway connexion, pressed for the construction of a stub line to Plattling. This was turned down, however, by the Royal Bavarian State Railways on the grounds that it would be uneconomic. As a result, Eichendorf, then a market town of 1,300 inhabitants, endeavoured to have a railway line to Aufhausen. The Minister of Transport in Munich not only supported this application, but went further and pushed through an extension of this planned line to Kröhstorf, in order to open up most of the valley of the River Vils. Eichendorf was thus given an intermediate station on this route.
On 26 June 1908 the Lokalbahn law was passed which authorized the Aufhausen–Kröhstorf railway. With a cost estimate of only 820,600 goldmarks it was one of the cheapest Bavarian branch lines. Its route on the sand, gravel and clay soils along the Vils was straightforward enough and only near Dorto did it have to cross the Petzenbach stream on a 6 metre long bridge.
In spite of that the starting date for the construction of the line was delayed due to drawn-out negotiations over the purchase of land and it was not until 4 August 1913 that work began on the excavations. On 1 August 1914 activity came to a complete standstill due to mobilization for the First World War and only recommenced on 1 October 1914. Further delays to deliveries caused by the war meant that it was not until 9 November 1915[1] that the first train was able to work the line.
Operations[edit]
The railway was never profitable. Its junction at Aufhausen was unfortunate because it was so configured that it trains had to
텀블러19

Spanish military cartridge that came out in 1871, replacing the Reformado cartridge. It was chambered in the Remington Rolling Block and was fairly popular, being used in some South American countries. The Rolling Block is a sturdy rifle and the .43 Spanish is capable of good accuracy. There were a couple of variations of this cartridge so if in doubt take a chamber cast.
HDS makes brass and bullets. Bullet weights are generally 340, 370 and 385 grains. Black or smokeless powder loads can be used if you are careful. While a good gun, most are over 100 years old so have any new purchases checked by a gunsmith and load accordingly.

.43 Spanish
11mm Spanish
11.15×58mmR Spanish Remington
U.M.C. 43-77

Type
Rifle

Specifications

Neck diameter
Bottleneck[1]

Overall length
2.845 in

Primer type
Berdan

The .43 Spanish was a centerfire firearms cartridge. The .43 Spanish was adopted about 1867,[citation needed] and was used in early rolling block rifles that Remington manufactured for the government of Spain.[citation needed] The cartridge is also referred to as “11mm Spanish”, and identical cartridges for the US Peabody rifle were marked “U.M.C. 43-77”.[2]
In 1869 the Spanish government put in an order for 10,000 rifles in this chambering.[3] The Spanish military version of the cartridge was later upgraded in 1889 to a “heavier, brass-jacketed reformado bullet”.[4]

Contents

1 Firearms chambered
2 References
3 External links
4 Further reading

Firearms chambered[edit]

Argentine Modelo 1879, rifle and carbine[1]
1869 Spanish Peabody[5]
Whitney–Burgess–Morse lever-action rifle (military version)[6]
Model 1879 Remington–Lee[7]

References[edit]

^ a b The History of Remington Firearms – Roy M. Marcot – Google Books
^ Cartridges for Collectors: Center fire, rimfire, patent ignition – Fred A. Datig – Google Books
^ United States Firearms: the First Century, 1776-1875 – David F. Butler – Google Books
^ The Spanish-American War and Philippine Insurrection: 1898-1902 – Alejandro Quesada – Google Books
^ Standard Catalog of Military Firearms: The Collector’s Price and Reference Guide – Philip Peterson – Google Books
^ The Official Gun Digest Book of Guns & Prices 2013 – Google Books
^ Standard Catalog Of Remington Firearms – Dan Shideler – Google Books

External links[edit]

.43 Spanish at LoadData.com

Further reading[edit]

Shooting the .43 Spanish Rolling Block. Croft Barker, Cistern Publishing 2003. ISBN 0971512833

몰카

Mopienga

Mopienga

Location in Burkina Faso

Coordinates: 13°06′N 0°0′E / 13.100°N 0.000°E / 13.100; 0.000

Country
Burkina Faso

Region
Est Region

Province
Gnagna Province

Department
Manni Department

Population (2005 est.)

 • Total
2,275

Mopienga is a town in the Manni Department of Gnagna Province in eastern Burkina Faso. The town has a population of 2,275.[1]
References[edit]

^ Burkinabé government inforoute communale

v
t
e

Gnagna Province

Capital: Bogandé

Bilanga
Department

Bilanga
Balamanou
Banga
Bartiboagou
Benhourgou
Bilamperga
Bilamperga-Peulh
Bilanga-Peulh
Bilanga-Yanga
Bilanga-Yanga Peulh
Botou
Bossongri
Boungou
Bourpangou
Cissa
Dipienga
Diamdiara
Diankoudoungou
Diapoadougou
Diamdoari
Diela
Dola
Doundougou
Fétary
Garpieni
Guinoama
Gomonsgou
Gninsonguin
Hartery
Harboungou
Karbani
Kabaré
Kiryomdéni
Kogodou
Koguina
Kolonkomi
Koulmasga
Moadéga
Moaka
Nagniangou
Ougarou
Paparcé
Papayenga (Diambanga)
Pantanloana
Piaga
Pissi
Pognankanré
Sabra
Sagadou
Saougou
Sebga
Sékouantou
Soultenga
Tampédou
Tampiokin
Tanibiaga
Thimborgou
Tiapaga
Tiguili
Tindané
Tobou
Tobou-Peulh
Tohogodou
Yacabé
Yassoumbaga
Yougpangou
Yougpankoudougou

Bogandé
Department

Bogandé
Babri
Banikidi
Benfoaka
Boukouin
Dapili
Dionfirga
Gnimpiendi
Gorgouin
Guitanga
Hinga
Kankalsi
Kierguin
Kodjoani-kankalsi
Kodjoani-léoura
Kohoura
Komboassi
Komoassi
Komonga
Kossougoudou
Kottia
Léoura
Léoura-Corga
Nagaré
Namountergou
Nindangou
Ognoadéni
Ouadangou
Ouapassi
Samou
Samou-Folga
Samou-Gabondi
Samou-Mama
Sorgha
Tanlomo
Thiargou
Thiéry

Coalla
Department

Coalla
Baka
Bamasgou
Bambrigoani
Bampouringa
Bani
Banidjoari
Bombontiangou
Boudabga
Boukargou
Boula
Darsalam
Diagourou
Diankongou
Didiemba
Dielkou
Doyana
Fantiangou
Ganta
Gnimpiema
Goulmodjo
Goundou
Kierga
Kontiandi
Lamoana
Mossadéni
Neiba
Poka
Samboandi
Santiari
Soula
Takou
Tankori
Thiongori
Thiouré
Tihandéni
Tindangou
Yassougou

Liptougou
Department

Liptougou
Bambilaré
Bantienima
Bonsiega
Dadounga
Dinalaye
Djibali
Djoari
Fouga
Gabondi
Kodjéna
Kokou
Lontakoani
Nadouonou
Nagnoagou
Nalenga
Nassourgou
Ouaboidi
Pintiagou
Souloungou
Tambiga
Tantiaka
Tolepsi
Touolongou

Manni
Department

Manni
Balemba
Bantouankpéba
Bangaye
Barhiaga
Bombonyenga
Boudangou
Boulyendé
Boungou Folgou
Boungou Natimsa
Bourgou
Dabesma
Dakiri
Dassari
Dayédé
Gongorgou
Gori
Kamissi
Kankantchiaga
Karamama
Koadaba
Komona
Komboassi
Ko
원정녀

2015 South Dakota Coyotes football

Conference
Missouri Valley Football Conference

2015 record
5–6 (3–5 MVFC)

Head coach
Joe Glenn (4th year)

Offensive coordinator
Wesley Beschorner

Defensive coordinator
Jason Petrino

Home stadium
DakotaDome
(Capacity: 10,000)

Seasons

« 2014
2016 »

2015 MVFC football standings

v
t
e

Conf
 
 
Overall

Team
 
W
 
L
 
 
 
 
W
 
L
 

#1 North Dakota State +^
 
7

1
 
 
 
 
13

2
 

#5 Illinois State +^
 
7

1
 
 
 
 
10

3
 

#8 Northern Iowa ^
 
5

3
 
 
 
 
9

5
 

#15 South Dakota State ^
 
5

3
 
 
 
 
8

4
 

Western Illinois ^
 
5

3
 
 
 
 
7

6
 

Indiana State
 
3

5
 
 
 
 
5

6
 

Youngstown State
 
3

5
 
 
 
 
5

6
 

South Dakota
 
3

5
 
 
 
 
5

6
 

Southern Illinois
 
2

6
 
 
 
 
3

8
 

Missouri State
 
0

8
 
 
 
 
1

10
 

+ – Conference co-champions
^ – FCS playoff participant

Rankings from STATS FCS Poll

The 2015 South Dakota Coyotes football team represented the University of South Dakota in the 2015 NCAA Division I FCS football season. They were led by fourth year head coach Joe Glenn and played their home games in the DakotaDome. They were a member of the Missouri Valley Football Conference. They finished the season 5–6, 3–5 in MVFC play to finish in a three way tie for sixth place.
On November 23rd, head coach Joe Glenn retired.[1] He finished at South Dakota with a four year record of 12–34.
Schedule[edit]

Date
Time
Opponent
Site
TV
Result
Attendance

September 5
6:00 PM
at Kansas State*
Bill Snyder Family Football Stadium • Manhattan, KS
K-StateHD.TV
L 0–34  
53,297

September 12
8:00 PM
at UC Davis*
Aggie Stadium • Davis, CA

W 27–17  
5,112

September 19
2:00 PM
Drake*
DakotaDome • Vermillion, SD
Midco/ESPN3
W 52–0  
8,045

October 3
2:00 PM
No. 10 Youngstown State
DakotaDome • Vermillion, SD
Midco/ESPN3
L 3–31  
10,015

October 10
3:00 PM
at Western Illinois
Hanson Field • Macomb, IL
MVC
19금

Estonia at the
2016 Summer Olympics

IOC code
EST

NOC
Estonian Olympic Committee

Website
www.eok.ee (Estonian)

in Rio de Janeiro

Competitors
45 in 13 sports

Flag bearer
Karl-Martin Rammo (opening)[1]
Mart Seim (closing)

Medals
Ranked 78th

Gold
Silver
Bronze
Total

0
0
1
1

Summer Olympics appearances (overview)

1920
1924
1928
1932
1936
1948–1988
1992
1996
2000
2004
2008
2012
2016

Other related appearances

 Russian Empire (1908–1912)
 Soviet Union (1952–1988)

Estonia competed at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 5 to 21 August 2016. This was the nation’s seventh consecutive appearance at the Games in the post-Soviet era and twelfth overall in Summer Olympic history.
The Estonian Olympic Committee fielded a team of 45 athletes, 28 men and 17 women, across 13 sports at the Games.[2] It was the nation’s second-largest delegation sent to the Olympics, just two athletes short of the record achieved in Beijing 2008 (47). Among the sports represented by its athletes, Estonia marked its Olympic return to triathlon after being absent from London 2012, as well as weightlifting after eight decades. Athletics had the largest team by sport with only 13 competitors, roughly a third of the nation’s full roster size. Apart from triathlon and weightlifting, there was also a single competitor each in archery, judo, and shooting.
Fifteen Estonian athletes competed in London, with discus thrower and 2008 champion Gerd Kanter, rowers Tõnu Endrekson and Andrei Jämsä, and épée fencer Nikolai Novosjolov headed to their fourth Games as the most experienced competitors of the team.[2] Sisters and marathon runners Leina, Liina, and Lily Luik set a historic record for Estonia, as the first identical triplets to compete in the same event at the Games.[3][4] Other notable athletes on the Estonian roster featured Greco-Roman wrestler and 2012 silver medalist Heiki Nabi in the super heavyweight category, and Laser sailor Karl-Martin Rammo, who was selected by the committee as the nation’s flag bearer in the opening ceremony.[1][5]
Estonia left Rio de Janeiro with only a bronze medal, signifying its poorest showing in Olympic history since the break-up of the Soviet Union. It was awarded to the rowing foursome of Endrekson, Jämsä, and three-time Olympians Allar Raja and Kaspar Taimsoo in the men’s quadruple sculls, rebounding from their out-of-medal position at London 2012.[6][7] Several Estonia
19금

American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine is a United States-based professional society which promotes health care professionals in the field of occupational safety and health.
Projects[edit]
In the early 1990s the ACOEM expressed concern about a shortage of physicians in its field.[1][2]
References[edit]

^ Castorina, J. S. (1990). “Physician Shortage in Occupational and Environmental Medicine”. Annals of Internal Medicine. 113 (12): 983–6. doi:10.7326/0003-4819-113-12-983. PMID 2240921. 
^ Rosenstock, L.; Rest, K. M.; Benson, J. A.; Cannella, J. M.; Cohen, J.; Cullen, M. R.; Davidoff, F.; Landrigan, P. J.; Reynolds, R. C.; Clever, L. H.; Ellis, G. B.; Goldstein, B. D. (1991). “Occupational and Environmental Medicine”. New England Journal of Medicine. 325 (13): 924–927. doi:10.1056/NEJM199109263251305. 

External links[edit]

Official website
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, which is published by the organization
guidelines published by ACOEM as archived by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

일본야동

The Eltonian niche is an ecological niche that emphasizes the functional attributes of animals and their corresponding trophic position. This was the definition Eugene Odum popularized in his analogy of the niche of a species with its profession in the ecosystem as opposed to the habitat being its address. The definition is attributed to Charles Elton in his 1927 now classic book Animal Ecology.[1] Elton used the two African Rhinoceros species to exemplify the definition. The White Rhinoceros has broad (wide, hence its name) mouthparts, which are efficient in harvesting grass, while the Black Rhinoceros has narrow pointed lips enabling it to feed selectively on the foliage of thorny bushes.
See also[edit]
Grinellian niche
References[edit]

^ Elton, C.(1927) Animal Ecology. Sidgwick and Jackson, London. Reprinted several times, e.g. 2001 by The University of Chicago Press, ISBN 0-226-20639-4

도신

Doubles

2006 Delray Beach International Tennis Championships

Champions
Mark Knowles
Daniel Nestor

Runners-up
Chris Haggard
Wesley Moodie

Final score
6–2, 6–3

Events

Singles
Doubles

← 2005
Delray Beach International Tennis Championships
2007 →

Main article: 2006 Delray Beach International Tennis Championships
Simon Aspelin and Todd Perry were the defending champions, but did not participate this year.
Mark Knowles and Daniel Nestor won in the final 6–2, 6–3, against Chris Haggard and Wesley Moodie.

Contents

1 Seeds
2 Draw

2.1 Key
2.2 Draw

3 External links

Seeds[edit]

Mark Knowles / Daniel Nestor (Champions)
Jordan Kerr / Travis Parrott (First Round)
Chris Haggard / Wesley Moodie (Final)
Jeff Coetzee / Rogier Wassen (Quarterfinals)

Draw[edit]
Key[edit]

Q = Qualifier
WC = Wild Card
LL = Lucky Loser
Alt = Alternate
SE = Special Exempt
PR = Protected Ranking
w/o = Walkover
r = Retired
d = Defaulted

Draw[edit]

First Round

Quarterfinals

Semifinals

Final

1
M Knowles
D Nestor
64
6
[10]

 
K Kim
H-t Lee
77
2
[2]

1
M Knowles
D Nestor
6
6
 

 
R Ginepri
B Reynolds
 
 
 

 
R Delgado
O Patience
1
1
 

 
R Delgado
O Patience
w/o
 
 

1
M Knowles
D Nestor
65
715
[10]

4
J Coetzee
R Wassen
7
7
 

 
O Marach
C Suk
77
613
[4]

 
J Gimelstob
J Thomas
5
5
 

4
J Coetzee
R Wassen
0
5
 

 
O Marach
C Suk
77
2
[10]

 
O Marach
C Suk
6
7
 

 
M Kohlmann
G Müller
65
6
[6]

1
M Knowles
D Nestor
6
6
 

 
D Udomchoke
Y-t Wang
3
3
 

3
C Haggard
W Moodie
2
3
 

WC
A Bogomolov, Jr.
T Widom
6
6
 

WC
A Bogomolov, Jr.
T Widom
3
2
 

 
A Fisher
T Phillips
1
4
 

3
C Haggard
W Moodie
6
6
 

3
C Haggard
W Moodie
6
6
 

3
C Haggard
W Moodie
6
6
 

WC
A Clayton
R Kendrick
4
2
 

 
G García-López
V Spadea
4
1
 

 
A Pavel
R Sabău
6
6
 

 
A Pavel
R Sabău
2
62
 

 
G García-López
V Spadea
6
6
 

 
G García-López
V Spadea
2
77
 

2
J Kerr
T Parrott
2
4
 

External links[edit]

Draw

주베야

The Winepress

Studio album by The Burial

Released
August 17, 2010 (2010-08-17)

Genre
Christian metal, metalcore, progressive metal, mathcore

Length
27:26

Label
Strike First

Producer
The Burial, Nick Nativo

The Burial chronology

Age of Deceit
(2009)
The Winepress
(2010)
Lights and Perfections
(2012)

The Winepress is the first studio album from The Burial. Strike First Records released the album on August 17, 2010. The Burial worked with Nick Nativo, in the production of this album.[1]

Contents

1 Critical reception
2 Track listing
3 Credits
4 References

Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings

Review scores

Source
Rating

Cross Rhythms
[2]

Indie Vision Music
[3]

Mind Equals Blown
[4]

The New Review
[5]

Rating the album seven out of ten at Cross Rhythms, Ian Webber writes, “No real element is lacking in this recording which is well played, professionally produced, and reveals glimpses of class, but with a little more refinement and subtle variations this good recording could have been so much better.”[2] Steve, giving the album four out of five stars for Indie Vision Music, states, “The Winepress is an excellent album that should be in any metal fan’s album collection. The raw vocals, intense brutality, and technicality are a welcome addition to an oversaturated genre.”[3] Awarding the album five stars from Mind Equals Blown, Caleb Martinez says, “The orchestration between all the instruments: diabolically brilliant … this deviantly twisted musical masterpiece. The Burial has achieved perfection: five stars!”[4] Josh, giving the album two and a half stars by The New Review, states, “The Burial has delivered a record mired in unoriginality and stained with a couple genre clichés, overshadowing the few glimpses of genuine talent and memorable composing. Let us pray for their success and better luck next time – let us pray.”[5]
Track listing[edit]

No.
Title
Length

1.
“Intercessor”  
2:04

2.
“Demons Never Sleep”  
3:55

3.
“The Winepress”  
3:58

4.
“Reconciliation”  
3:23

5.
“Valley of Decision”  
2:43

6.
“Delegation of the Seven Plagues”  
2:49

7.
“Monolith”  
4:15

8.
“Death, Conquered”  
4:19

Total length:
27:26

Credits[edit]

The Burial

David Marshall – Vocals
Todd Hatfield – Guitar
Jeff Wright – Guitar
Jake Neece – Bass
Randy Rospopo – Drums

Production

Nick Nativo – Producer, Engineer, Mixing, Mastering
Eric Bukowsk
포르노