Edythe Danick London (born September 14, 1948)[1] is The Thomas and Katherine Pike Professor of Addiction Studies, and Director of the UCLA Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology at the David Geffen School of Medicine University of California at Los Angeles. London received her Ph.D. in Pharmacology from the University of Maryland (Baltimore). She did a post-doctoral fellowship at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.[2]
Prior to joining the UCLA faculty, she was a Senior Scientist at the National Institute on Drug Abuse for 23 years and a member of the faculty at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She is known internationally for her work on drug addiction as well as other addictive disorders, such as tobacco and nicotine dependence. She has been a pioneer in the development and use of advanced brain imaging techniques to study the effects of drugs, tobacco and other substances of abuse on brain function, including nuclear medicine studies such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET), and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Her UCLA laboratory is engaged in a wide range of scientific studies as well as the development and testing of new medications. The Web of Science lists several hundred articles published in peer-reviewed journals that have been cited over 13,000 times, leading to an h-index of 63.[3]
Her house in Beverly Hills, California was vandalized on October 23, 2007, in an act credited to an animal activist group Animal Liberation Front by breaking a window of the house and inserting a garden hose which flooded the house. Over $50,000 damage was reported.[4] Subsequently, her house was again attacked and damaged by a firebomb left at the front door on Tuesday, February 5, 2008. No one was home at the time. A statement issued by the North American Animal Liberation Press Office[5] claimed that animal liberationists were responsible for placing the device.[6]
References[edit]

^ American men & women of science, Google Books, retrieved 01 August 2012
^ bio of London from UCLA med school
^ Web of Science, accessed January 29, 2013.
^ “Animal-Rights Militants Vandalize UCLA Researcher’s House” By JJ Hermes Chronicle of Higher Education Tuesday, October 30, 2007
^ “UCLA Vivisector Gets Return Visit from Animal Liberationists” (Press release). North American Animal Liberation Press Office. February 6, 2008. Archived from the original on 2008-02-11. Retrieved 2009-08-20. 
^ “UCLA Professor’s House Is Firebombed” Chr
섹스

Tears of Martyr

Origin
Las Palmas, Spain

Genres
Symphonic metal
Gothic metal[1]
Death/doom

Years active
1996 (1996)–present

Labels
Massacre Records

Website
tearsofmartyr.com

Members
Berenice Musa
Miguel Angel Marqués
Adrián Miranda
Doramas Párraga

Tears Of Martyr is a Spanish symphonic metal band from Las Palmas. The band was formed in 1996. Their latest album Tales was released with Massacre Records on April 26, 2013.[2][3]

Contents

1 History
2 Members
3 Discography
4 References
5 External links

History[edit]
The band was formed in 1996 in Las Palmas, Spain. In 1996 they released their first demo album The Essence of Evil. After a long years of silence comes out their second demo Renascence (2005). In 2007 band moved to Madrid. In June 2009, they released their first full-length album Entrance.[4] Later that year lead singer Berenice Musa won Metal Female Awards 2009 in the category of best Spanish metal band singer.
In August 2012 the band entered New Sin Studio (Italy) where they have recorded and mastered their second full-length album Tales produced by Enrik García (Dark Moor).[3] The album was released with Massacre Records on April 26, 2013.[2]
Members[edit]

Current line-up

Berenice Musa – soprano
Miguel Angel Marqués – guitars and vocals
Adrián Miranda – bass
Doramas Párraga – drums

Former members

Armando J. Álvarez – vocals, bass
Javier Montesdeoca – guitar
Oscar Morante – guitar
Yeray Corujo – keyboard

Discography[edit]

Demo

The Essence of Evil (1996)
Renascence (2005)

Albums

Entrance (2009)
Tales (2013)

References[edit]

^ Tears of Martyr on Encyclopaedia Metallum. Retrieved 10 May 2015.
^ a b “Tales – Tears Of Martyr – Massacre Records”. Retrieved 10 May 2015. 
^ a b “Tears of Martyr – About”. Tearsofmartyr.com. Retrieved 10 May 2015. 
^ Entrance at Discogs (list of releases) Retrieved 10 May 2015.

External links[edit]

Official website
Tears of Martyr on Facebook
Tears of Martyr’s channel on YouTube
Tears of Martyr at Encyclopaedia Metallum

This article about a Spanish band or other musical ensemble is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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도신

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

“Flying in a Blue Dream”

Song by Joe Satriani from the album Flying in a Blue Dream

Released
October 30, 1989

Recorded
Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, CA; Hyde Street Studios; Different Fur; Coast Recorders; Alpha & Omega Recording, San Francisco, CA

Genre
Instrumental rock

Length
5:28

Label
Relativity Records

Writer(s)
Joe Satriani

Producer(s)
Joe Satriani,
John Cuniberti

Flying in a Blue Dream track listing

“Flying in a Blue Dream”
(1)
“The Mystical Potato Head Groove Thing”
(2)

“Flying in a Blue Dream” is the title track off Joe Satriani’s third studio album. It starts with a recording of a radio station teamed with emotional feedback then follows into the proper song. It is one of Satriani’s most popular songs, and is still performed at all of his live concerts. Live versions can be found on the Live in San Francisco, Satriani Live!, and G3: Live in Concert albums.
The intro heard was not planned, but was recorded nonetheless by producer John Cuniberti while recording Satriani’s guitar parts for the song. Apparently, Satriani’s amplifier was picking up a frequency from a radio or TV station, and Cuniberti simply said, “I’m recording this,” and proceeded. Amidst the recorded speech is a young boy’s voice saying “sometimes afterwards they still like each other, and sometimes they don’t.” The same excerpt is still used today when Satriani performs the song in concert. The acoustic rhythm guitar part is usually played as a backing track.[citation needed]
Musically, the track strongly features the C Lydian mode, giving it a spacey-dreamy feeling.
Also featured strongly in the track is Joe Satriani’s fluid and complex usage of the legato technique to quickly play scalar runs.
When played live, the intro feedback is produced by Satriani and then manipulated by physically moving himself and his guitar to different positions relative to his amplifier – this changes the frequencies of the feedback, giving an interesting array of variations on the initial feedback. Satriani knows where the harmonics are generated on each separate stage on tour by “mapping them out” during soundchecks and marking the physical points on-stage with tape.
Awards & Nominations[edit]

2014 – VH1`s “2
19금

In computer graphics, relief mapping is a texture mapping technique used to render the surface details of three-dimensional objects accurately and efficiently.[1] It can produce accurate depictions of self-occlusion, self-shadowing, and parallax.[2] It is a form of short-distance raytrace done in a pixel shader.[citation needed] Relief mapping is highly comparable in both function and approach to another displacement texture mapping technique, Parallax occlusion mapping, considering that they both rely on raytraces, though the two are not to be confused with each other, as parallax occlusion mapping uses reverse heightmap tracing.
See also[edit]

Computer graphics portal

Shaded relief
Bump mapping
Normal mapping
Parallax mapping

References[edit]

^ Policarpo, F., Olivieira, M. M., Comba, J. L. D. (2005). “‘Real-time relief mapping on arbitrary polygonal surfaces'” (PDF). Proceedings of the 2005 Symposium on Interactive 3D Graphics and Games: 155–162.  CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)
^ Policarpo, F., Olveira, M. M. (2006). “‘Relief Mapping of Non-Height-Field Surface Details” (PDF). Proceedings of the 2006 symposium on Interactive 3D graphics and games. Retrieved 18 February 2011.  CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)

External links[edit]

Manuel’s Relief texture mapping

This computer graphics–related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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오야넷

Harry Schmidt may refer to:

Harry Schmidt (Air National Guard), American fighter pilot instructor, who bombed a platoon of Canadians, four were killed and eight injured in Afghanistan
Harry Schmidt (USMC) (1886–1968), commanded the Fourth Marine Division, in the Pacific, during World War II
Harry Schmidt (pentathlete) (1916–1977), South African Olympic modern pentathlete

This disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

몰카

Coordinates: 40°43′21″N 45°00′12″E / 40.72250°N 45.00333°E / 40.72250; 45.00333

Gosh
Գոշ

Gosh
Գոշ

Coordinates: 40°43′21″N 45°00′12″E / 40.72250°N 45.00333°E / 40.72250; 45.00333

Country
Armenia

Marz (Province)
Tavush

Population (2008)

 • Total
1,079

Time zone
  (UTC+4)

Gosh (Armenian: Գոշ) is a village located in the Tavush Province of Armenia. It is named after Mkhitar Gosh who took part in the re-building of the older monastery of Nor Ghetik during the 12th-13th centuries, which had been destroyed by an earthquake in 1188. The newly built monastery was later named Goshavank in honor of Mkhitar. Goshavank is located just off the main highway that runs through town. On a hillside west of the monastery complex sits a chapel that also serves as the tomb of Mkhitar Gosh. It was situated to overlook the monastery in which he helped build. The chapel is square in plan with a single centrally located dome above and one portal. Nearby are the ruins of what are said to be Mkhitar’s house. Stone foundations and low walls still exist.
Gallery[edit]

View of the village

Goshavank, August 2009.

Mkhitar Gosh’s funeral chapel.

The ruins of Mikhtar Gosh’s house.

Gosh lake

References[edit]

Gosh, Armenia at GEOnet Names Server
World Gazeteer: Armenia – World-Gazetteer.com
Report of the results of the 2001 Armenian Census, National Statistical Service of the Republic of Armenia

External links[edit]

Armeniapedia.org
Virtualarmenia.am

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Tavush Province

Capital: Ijevan

Towns

Ayrum
Berd
Dilijan
Ijevan
Noyemberyan

Villages

Achajur
Acharkut
Aknaghbyur
Artsvaberd
Aygedzor
Aygehovit
Archis
Aygepar
Azatamut
Baghanis
Bagratashen
Barekamavan
Berdavan
Berkaber
Chinari
Chinchin
Choratan
Debetavan
Deghdzavan
Ditavan
Dovegh
Gandzakar
Getahovit
Haghtanak
Itsakar
Jujevan
Khashtarak
Kirants
Koghb
Koti
Lchkadzor
Lusadzor
Lusahovit
Movses
Navur
Nerkin Karmiraghbyur
Nerkin Tsaghkavan
Norashen
Paravakar
Ptghavan
Sarigyugh
Sevkar
Shamakhyan
Tavush
Varagavan
Vazashen
Verin Karmiraghbyur
Verin Tsaghkavan
Voskepar
Voskevan
Yenokavan
Zorakan

Non-community
villages

Aghavnavank
Geghatap
Gosh
Haghartsin
Hovk
Kayan
Khachardzan
Teghut

Former villages

Chermakavan

This article about a location in Tavush Province, Armenia is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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섹파

John Dunovant

John Dunovant

Born
(1825-03-05)March 5, 1825
Chester, South Carolina

Died
October 1, 1864(1864-10-01) (aged 39)
near the James River, Petersburg, Virginia

Buried at
Private Family Cemetery
Chester, South Carolina

Allegiance
 United States of America
Confederate States of America

Service/branch
 United States Army
 Confederate States Army

Years of service
1846–1847; 1855–1860 (USA)
1861–1864 (CSA)

Rank
Captain (USA)
Colonel
Brigadier General (temporary)

Unit
Palmetto Regiment
10th U.S. Infantry Regiment

Commands held
Fort Moultrie
1st South Carolina Regulars
5th South Carolina Cavalry
Dunovant’s Cavalry Brigade

Battles/wars

American Civil War

Battle of Fort Sumter
Battle of Drewry’s Bluff
Battle of Cold Harbor
Battle of Trevilian Station
Battle of Peebles’ Farm
Battle of Vaughan Road †

John Dunovant was a brigadier general with temporary rank in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War.[1][2] Dunovant was a native of South Carolina who had been a Mexican-American War veteran and captain in the U.S. Army from March 3, 1855 to December 29, 1860. During the Civil War, he was commander of the 1st South Carolina Regulars and later the 5th South Carolina Cavalry Regiment. He was in command of a cavalry brigade in the later part of the Overland Campaign and the early part of the Siege of Petersburg. He was killed at the Battle of Vaughan Road on October 1, 1864 during the Siege of Petersburg.

Contents

1 Early life
2 American Civil War service
3 Death
4 See also
5 Notes
6 References

Early life[edit]
John Dunovant was born in Chester, South Carolina, in 1825.[1] He was the son of John Dunovant and Margaret Sloan Quay. He was the brother of Richard Dunovant, a South Carolina militia brigadier general, colonel of the 12th South Carolina Infantry Regiment from September 1, 1861 to April 2, 1862, a South Carolina legislator and planter.[1]
John Dunovant was a sergeant in the Palmetto Regiment of South Carolina volunteers in the Mexican-American War.[1] He was wounded at the Battle of Chapultepec.[1] Dunovant was mustered out of the volunteers on December 7, 1847.[1]
Dunovant was commissioned directly into the regular U. S. Army as a captain of the 10th Infantry Regiment on March 3, 1855 when that unit was organized as a new regiment.[1] He resigned from the U.S. Army on December 29, 1860, a few days after South Carolina seceded from the Union and offered his
천사티비

Cartwright
Sydney, New South Wales

Cartwright Public School

Population
2,256 (2011 census)[1]

Established
1972

Postcode(s)
2168

Location
38 km (24 mi) south-west of Sydney

LGA(s)
City of Liverpool

State electorate(s)
Liverpool

Federal Division(s)
Werriwa

Suburbs around Cartwright:

Miller
Sadleir
Ashcroft

Miller
Cartwright
Liverpool

Prestons
Prestons
Lurnea

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Cartwright is a suburb in south-western Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia 38 kilometres south-west of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of the City of Liverpool.

Contents

1 Geography
2 History
3 Education
4 Transport
5 Demographics
6 References

Geography[edit]
It is bounded by the suburbs of Prestons, Miller, Ashcroft, Sadlier, and Liverpool. Housing in the area is a combination of houses and flats. Cabramatta Creek forms the northern (Ashcroft/Sadlier) and west boundary (Miller), Maxwells Creek the east boundary (Liverpool), and Hoxton Park Rd the south boundary (Prestons). There is an extensive network of shared pathways interconnecting the many cul-de-sacs present in the area. A bridge also links it to Miller, crossing over Cabramatta Creek. Liverpool City BMX Club also has its grounds in Powell Park. There is also McGirr Park in the north-east.
History[edit]
Cartwright was officially declared a suburb in 1972 and was developed as part of the Green Valley Housing Estate in the 1960s. It was named after Robert Cartwright who was the reverend of St Luke’s church in Liverpool and who received a land grant in the local area.[2]
Education[edit]
Cartwright Public school was opened in 1967. Macarthur Community College is also located within the schools grounds. The local high school is Miller Technology High School.
Transport[edit]
It is served by bus services T80 (Ash stop, not Cartwright), along the dedicated T-Way bus lane, and Busabout bus routes 861, 853, 854, 855. The nearest rail station is Liverpool, on the South Line. The main arterial road is Hoxton Park Road, leading to the Hume Highway in the east, connecting to Cowpasture Rd in the west. Cartwright Ave also feeds into smaller streets serving the rest of the suburb.
Demographics[e
원정녀

1979 Egypt Cup Final

Event
1978–79 Egypt Cup

Zamalek
Ghazl El Mahalla

3
0

Date
27 April 1979

← 1978
1981 →

1979 Egypt Cup Final, was the final match of the 1978–79 Egypt Cup, was between Zamalek and Ghazl El Mahalla, Zamalek won the match 3–0.[1]

Match details[edit]

Zamalek v Ghazl El Mahalla

27 April 1979

Zamalek
3 – 0
Ghazl El Mahalla

Khalil  15′
Kamel  43′
Gaafar  63’ (.pen)
Report

Zamalek:

GK

Adel El-Maamour

RB

Sami Mansour

CB

Mahmoud Saad

CB

Ibrahim Youssef

LB

Sabri El-Meniawi

CM

Tarek Ghonaim

 ?’

CM

Farouk Gaafar

RW

Magdi Shalaby

 ?’

AM

Wahid Kamel

FW

Ali Khalil

FW

Mahmoud El-Khawaga

Substitutions:

DF

Mohamed Taher

 ?’

MF

Mohamed Abdullah “Hamama”

 ?’

Manager:

Ghazl El Mahalla:

GK

El-Balouty

RB

Khaled Karam

CB

El-Said Abdel Gawwad

CB

Mohamed El-Gamil

LB

Sukkar

CM

Shawki Ghareeb

CM

Lotfi El-Shennawi

RW

Kamal Abdel Khalek

 ?’

AM

Omar Abdullah

 ?’

LW

Nabil Kharoub

CF

Ahmed Hassan

Substitutions:

MF

Abdel Rehim Khalil

 ?’

FW

Hossam Abdel Ghani

 ?’

Manager:

References[edit]

^ http://www.angelfire.com/ak/EgyptianSports/zamalekcup7879.html#Mahala

External links[edit]

http://www.angelfire.com/ak/EgyptianSports/ZamalekInEgyptCup.html#1979

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Egypt Cup

Seasons

1921–22
1922–23
1923–24
1924–25
1925–26
1926–27
1927–28
1928–29
1929–30
1930–31
1931–32
1932–33
1933–34
1934–35
1935–36
1936–37
1937–38
1938–39
1939–40
1940–41
1941–42
1942–43
1943–44
1944–45
1945–46
1946–47
1947–48
1948–49
1949–50
1950–51
1951–52
1952–53
1953–54
1954–55
1955–56
1956–57
1957–58
1958–59
1990–91
1991–92
1992–93
1993–94
1994–95
1995–96
1996–97
1997–98
1998–99
1999–00
2000–01
2001–02
2002–03
2003–04
2004–05
2005–06
2006–07
2007–08
2008–09
2009–10
2010–11
2011–12
2012–13
2013–14
2014–15
2015–16
2016–17

Finals

1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988

써니넷