Matthias “Hias” Noichl (October 17, 1920 – December 19, 2002) was an Austrian cross country skier who competed in the 1940s and in the 1950s.
In 1948 he finished 45th in the 18 km competition.
Four years later he finished 28th in the 18 km event at the 1952 Winter Olympics in Oslo.
External links[edit]

18 km Olympic cross country results: 1948-52

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Bryony Gordon

Born
(1980-07-05) 5 July 1980 (age 36)

Nationality
British

Occupation
Journalist, memoirist

Spouse(s)
Harry Wilson (m. 2013)

Children
1

Relatives
Jane Gordon (mother)

Bryony Gordon (born 5 July 1980[1]) is a British journalist.

Contents

1 Early life
2 Career
3 Personal life
4 Bibliography
5 References
6 External links

Early life[edit]
Gordon is the daughter of Sunday Mirror gossip columnist Jane Gordon.[2] She has two siblings, Rufus and Naomi.[3] She was educated at a Kew College primary school and later attended the independent Queen’s Gate School (an all girls school) in South Kensington.[4] She went on to study History of Art at University College London before dropping out after one term.[2][5][6]
Career[edit]
Gordon began her career interning for the Daily Express, writing occasional feature articles for the newspaper. She then began writing a youth-oriented column for the Sunday Express, before writing for The Daily Telegraph’s teen supplement in 2000.[7] In 2001, Gordon joined the Daily Mirror gossip column known as The 3AM Girls.[2] After the Mirror, Gordon resumed writing for The Daily Telegraph.
Since 2006, Gordon has written the “Notebook” column, appearing in The Daily Telegraph every Thursday, as well as additional special features, such as interviews with notable figures.[8] She also writes the How the Other Half Lives column for the Sunday Telegraph’s Stella magazine.[9] In 2007, Gordon was shortlisted for Young Journalist of the Year, at the British Press Awards.[10] Gordon also writes for the Telegraph blogs section.[11]
In June 2014, Gordon published her first book, The Wrong Knickers: A Decade of Chaos, a memoir of “hedonistic antics” during her single life, and a “lost decade” of drink, drugs and promiscuity.[12][13]
Personal life[edit]
Gordon married Harry Wilson, a financial journalist, on 5 July 2013. They have a daughter, Edie, and live in Clapham in London.[9][12]
Bibliography[edit]

Gordon, Bryony (2014). The Wrong Knickers: A Decade of Chaos. Headline. ISBN 1472210158. 

References[edit]

^ “Twitter / bryony_gordon: Tomorrow is my birthday and”. Twitter.com. 4 July 2014. Retrieved 11 July 2014. 
^ a b c Sawyer, Miranda. “Hot gossip”. The Guardian. Retrieved 11 July 2014. 
^ http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/you/article-1326557/Jane-Gordon-How-I-Stepford-Mother-hell.html
^ http://www.chiswickw4.com/default.asp?section=info&page=bryonygordon001.htm
^ Gordon, Br
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Glory Fall

Formation
2010

Headquarters
Manteca, California

Parent organization

Place of Refuge (under the umbrella of Assemblies of God)

Website
www.gloryfall.org

Glory Fall Outpouring (sometimes stylized as GloryFall) is an all-ages Christian event held annually in Manteca, California at the Place of Refuge Church. Glory Fall is run by The Pulse, a ministry of the church. The event hosts hundreds of people each year. The tagline for the event every year is “His presence is our pulse.”

Contents

1 History
2 Aslan
3 Empower + Release
4 External links

History[edit]
Glory Fall first began on September 3, 2010 as a two-day event at the Place of Refuge Church. The event was led by Refuge Church’s youth pastor and worship director, Rob Cox. The first year included speakers Jurgen Matthesius from Planet Shakers, Jeremy Johnson from Ammunition Conference, and Sean Smith amongst others as well as worship music by Rick Pino, Chris Ritchie, and Aslan. Since then, speakers have included Pat Schatzline and Matt Gonzales with worship by Jake Hamilton, Amber Brooks from MorningStar Ministries, Melissa How from Jesus Culture, and Will Matthews from Bethel Church. In contrast to most other Christian outreach events, Glory Fall has focused on making
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Look up barring in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Barring may refer to:

Barring (music), a guitar performance technique
Barring engine, a small engine that forms part of the installation of a large stationary steam engine

See also[edit]

Bar (disambiguation)

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Barring.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

현자타임

For the Napoleonic-era naval captain, see Thomas Fellowes (1778-1853). For other people of the same name, see Fellows.

Thomas Hounsom Butler Fellowes

The Naval Brigade at Goon-Goona. The mounted figure is most likely to be Captain Fellowes

Born
1827

Died
1923

Allegiance
United Kingdom

Service/branch
Royal Navy

Rank
Rear Admiral

Battles/wars
1868 Expedition to Abyssinia

Awards
Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath

Rear Admiral Sir Thomas Hounsom Butler Fellowes, KCB (1827–1923[1]) was an officer in the Royal Navy during the Victorian era.

Contents

1 Life
2 Career
3 Deputy Lord Lieutenant of Hertford
4 Awards
5 References

Life[edit]
Born in 1827 to the physician James Fellowes (making him nephew to Vice-Admiral Thomas Fellowes), he joined the Royal Navy and achieved the rank of rear admiral. He lived at Woodfield Park, Stevenage and died in 1923 at the impressive age of 96. He married Margaret, and their youngest son, Ivan Gordon Fellowes (b. 1898) joined the Royal Navy and died at sea on 18 March 1915 aged 17 in HMS Irresistible when she struck a mine.
Career[edit]
Fellowes was promoted to lieutenant on 10 December 1852[2] and served in the flagship of Vice-Admiral William Fanshawe Martin, HMS Marlborough, in the Mediterranean Fleet.[3] He was promoted commander on 24 June 1862[3] and on 3 May 1867 took command of HMS Dryad on the East Indies Station.[3] As captain of Dryad he commanded a Naval Brigade of 80 men during the 1868 Expedition to Abyssinia, seeing action at Arogye Pass and the Battle of Magdala. He was invalided out of the ship shortly afterwards.[3] He was promoted to captain on 14 August 1868[2] for his services in the Abyssinian War and retired on 1 October 1873.[4] He was promoted on the retired list to rear admiral on 1 January 1886.[5]
Deputy Lord Lieutenant of Hertford[edit]
On 12 June 1912 Fellowes was appointed Deputy Lord Lieutenant of the County of Hertford.[6]
Awards[edit]

Abyssinian War Medal
KCB[2]

References[edit]

^ Diary of a Journey to Abyssinia 1868: The Diary and Observations of William Simpson, by William Simpson, Richard Pankhurst, Frederic Sharf, published by Tsehai Publishers, 2002, ISBN 0-9723172-1-X
^ a b c “Executive Officers (F)”. Archived from the original on 7 February 2012. Retrieved 9 March 2008. 
^ a b c d “William Loney RN website – Thomas Hounsom Butler Fellowes Biography”. Retrieved 8 March 2008. 
^ The London Gazette: no. 24022. p. 4430. 3 October 1873. R
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Tubul River is a river of the Bío Bío Region of Chile. Where the river reaches the Pacific Ocean stands the small fishing village of Tubul.
The coastline near the egress of the river is cliff-lined and hilly. Prior to 1835, the lower mile of the river was navigable. An earthquake in that year temporarily blocked off the river by raising the sand bar.[1] In 2010 nearby Concepción was struck by a magnitude 8.8 earthquake. Multiple waves generated by the earthquake, arriving from both the ocean and the river, struck and nearly destroyed the village of Tubul.[2]
See also[edit]

Tubul Formation

References[edit]

^ Findlay, Alexander George (1863), A Directory for the Navigation of the South Pacific Ocean: With Descriptions of Its Coasts, Islands, Etc., from the Strait of Magalhaens to Panama, and Those of New Zealand, Australia, Etc, R. H. Laurie, p. 108. 
^ Barrionuevo, Alexei (March 2, 2010), “The Sea, Lifeblood of Chilean Towns, Turns Deadly”, The New York Times, retrieved 2013-02-16. 

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Hydrography of Bío Bío Region

Rivers

Andalién
Bío Bío
Bureo
Carampangue
Chillán
Duqueco
Guaqui
Itata
Laja
Laraquete
Lebu
Licauquén
Lirquén
Lleulleu
Lonquén
Lonquimay
Mulchén
Ñuble
Paicavi
Pilmaiquén
Quilacoya
Queuco
Quiapo
Quidico
Rahue
Ranquil
Rele
Renaico
Vergara
Tavolevo
Tirua
Tubul
Tucapel

Waterfalls

Laja
Rahue

Lakes

Laja
Lanalhue
Lleulleu

This Bío Bío Region location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Troy, Indiana

Town

The Nester House, a historic landmark in the town

Location of Troy in the state of Indiana

Coordinates: 37°59′38″N 86°47′58″W / 37.99389°N 86.79944°W / 37.99389; -86.79944Coordinates: 37°59′38″N 86°47′58″W / 37.99389°N 86.79944°W / 37.99389; -86.79944

Country
United States

State
Indiana

County
Perry

Township
Troy

Area[1]

 • Total
0.32 sq mi (0.83 km2)

 • Land
0.32 sq mi (0.83 km2)

 • Water
0 sq mi (0 km2)

Elevation
472 ft (144 m)

Population (2010)[2]

 • Total
385

 • Estimate (2012[3])
380

 • Density
1,203.1/sq mi (464.5/km2)

Time zone
Central (CST) (UTC-6)

 • Summer (DST)
CDT (UTC-5)

FIPS code
18-76634[4]

GNIS feature ID
0444924[5]

Troy is a town in Troy Township, Perry County, Indiana, along the Ohio River near the mouth of the Anderson River. The population was 385 at the 2010 census.

Contents

1 History
2 Geography
3 Demographics

3.1 2010 census
3.2 2000 census

4 See also
5 References

History[edit]
Troy was laid out in 1815.[6] Troy was an early county seat of Perry County.[7] A post office has been in operation at Troy since 1818.[8]
The Nester House was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1990.[9]
Future U.S. President Abraham Lincoln began operating a ferry near present-day Troy in 1826[10][11]
Geography[edit]
Troy is located at 37°59′38″N 86°47′58″W / 37.99389°N 86.79944°W / 37.99389; -86.79944 (37.993975, -86.799397).[12]
According to the 2010 census, Troy has a total area of 0.32 square miles (0.83 km2), all land.[1]
Demographics[edit]

Historical population

Census
Pop.

1860
363

1870
480

32.2%

1880
495

3.1%

1890
554

11.9%

1900
599

8.1%

1910
510

−14.9%

1920
454

−11.0%

1930
562

23.8%

1940
599

6.6%

1950
537

−10.4%

1960
528

−1.7%

1970
575

8.9%

1980
550

−4.3%

1990
465

−15.5%

2000
392

−15.7%

2010
385

−1.8%

Est. 2015
371
[13]
−3.6%

U.S. Decennial Census[14]

2010 census[edit]
As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 385 people, 163 households, and 103 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,203.1 inhabitants per square mile (464.5/km2). There were 190 housing units at an average density of 593.8 per square mile (229.3/km2). The racial makeup of
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Select Live

Select Live Logo

Presented by
Drew Neemia

Country of origin
New Zealand

Original language(s)
English

Production

Running time
120 – 180 minutes

Release

Original network
C4 (New Zealand)

Original release
2003 – 2010

External links

Website

Select Live and Select were music video request shows that screened every day on the C4 music channel in New Zealand. The shows operated for fifty weeks a year from 2003 to 2010, with videos added to the playlist each week.
The original format show, Select, originally played every day from 4:00pm to 7:00pm but later only aired on weekend days during this timeslot. This show did not have a presenter; special “text codes” scrolled along the bottom of the screen and corresponded to a particular song.
The Select Live format screened weekdays from 4:00pm to 6:00pm. Songs to be played were requested by sending an SMS message of a particular format to a designated number. The show was hosted by Joel Defries from 2005 until August 3, 2007, then by Jermaine Leef until 2008, then by Drew Neemia until 2011. It was initially sponsored by Vodafone and broadcast as Vodafone Select Live.
Regular segments featured on the live screenings of the show include Under Drew’s Hat, which features celebrity gossip and news, Top 5, which screens on Fridays, featuring the songs most voted for on the show and the “Mattle” with Drew Neemia versus C4’s Matt in a battle of music videos for viewers to vote for.
The show was cancelled on 4 February 2010 when C4 was moved to Freeview to make way for FOUR; retro video shuffle C42 replaced it on the programming schedule. A similar format show was introduced on FOUR, initially called Drew and Shannon Live and later called Four Live.

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Marc Bell

Artist at work; A photo of Marc Bell taken at the Monthly Montreal Comix Jam, February 25, 2004

Born
Marc Bell
1971 (1971)
London, Ontario

Nationality
Canadian

Area(s)

Cartoonist
Artist

Notable works

Shrimpy and Paul and Friends, Hot Potatoe, Pure Pajamas, Stroppy

Marc Bell (born 1971 in London, Ontario) is a Canadian cartoonist and artist. He was initially known for creating comic strips (such as Shrimpy and Paul), but Bell has also created several exhibitions of his mixed media work and watercoloured drawings. Hot Potatoe [sic], a monograph of his work, was released in 2009. His comics have appeared in many Canadian weeklies, Vice, and LA Weekly. He has been published in numerous anthologies, such as Kramers Ergot and The Ganzfeld.

Contents

1 Publications
2 Anthology work
3 Solo exhibitions
4 Awards and nominations
5 Solo and collaborative self-published booklets
6 External links

Publications[edit]

Boof, 1992, Caliber Press (Plymouth, MI)
Hep, 1993, Caliber Press (Plymouth, MI)
The Mojo Action Companion Unit Vol.2 #1, 1997, Exclaim! (Toronto, ON)
Shrimpy and Paul and Friends, 2003, Highwater Books (Brooklyn, NY)
Worn Tuff Elbow #1, 2004, Fantagraphics (Seattle, WA)
The Stacks, 2004, Drawn & Quarterly (Montreal, PQ)
The Hobbit (with Peter Thompson), 2005, PictureBox (Brooklyn, NY)
Fresh From Kiev, 2005, Bulb Comix (Geneva, CH)
Nog a Dod (editor), 2006, Conundrum Press (Montreal, PQ) in association with PictureBox
Ganzfeld #5 (editor), 2007, PictureBox (Brooklyn, NY)
Illusztraijuns for Brain Police [sic], 2008, Drawn & Quarterly/Half World Books (Montreal, PQ)
Hot Potatoe [sic], 2009, Drawn & Quarterly (Montreal, PQ)
Kelp Stingray (with Matthew Thurber), 2009, Nieves (Zurich, CH)
Shrimpy et Paul, 2010, Editions Cornélius (Paris, FR)
Dirty Dishes (editor) by Amy Lockhart, 2010, Drawn and Quarterly (Montreal, PQ)
Pure Pajamas, 2011, Drawn & Quarterly (Montreal, PQ)
Shrimpy e Paul, 2012, A Bolha Editora (Rio de Janeiro, BR)
Rudy (editor) by Mark Connery, 2014, 2D Cloud (Minneapolis, MN)
Love and Forgiveness (editor) by Joe Hale, 2014, Swimmers Group (Toronto, ON)
Boutique Mag, 2014, Colour Code Printing (Toronto, ON)
Stroppy, 2015, Drawn & Quarterly (Montreal, PQ)

Anthology work[edit]

Rosetta, “He Works Inside the Condiment Dispenser”, 2002, Alternative Comics (Gainsville, FL), 4 endflaps on covers
L’enfance Dub Cyclope 2, “Il N’Y A Pas D’Issue!”, Zone Convective (Montreal PQ), 10 page
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